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A Step Toward Revolutionary Computing by Improving Topological Material

HRL Laboratories, LLC, hopes to advance the vast potential of two-dimensional topological materials for quantum computation. With an award from DARPA, this project—Suppressing Trivial Edge Conductance in 2D Topological Materials—will take a step closer to development of topological qubits that keep fragile quantum information safe from environmental effects.

The ExACT Tools for Safe Autonomy

HRL Laboratories, LLC, will join the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) in its Autonomy Assurance (AA) program with the Expressive Assurance Case Toolkit (ExACT), a set of algorithmic tools that will mathematically verify that the autonomous driving system’s algorithms are correct and safe.

HRL Laboratories Named 2018 Edison Awards Finalist in 3D Printing Category

HRL Laboratories, LLC, has been named a finalist in the Applied Technology/3D Printing category of the 2018 Edison Awards for their work in microstructure control of materials. Gold, silver, and bronze award winners will be announced at the 31st Annual Edison Awards Gala held Wednesday April 11, 2018 in New York City.

Making DREaM Come True for DARPA

HRL Laboratories, LLC, has received an award from the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) to develop the next generation of gallium nitride (GaN) transistors with dramatically improved linearity and noise figure at reduced power consumption for use in electronic devices that manage the electromagnetic spectrum from radio communications to radar.

Leslie Momoda Wins UCLA Engineering Award

HRL Laboratories, LLC, Vice President Leslie Momoda has won the 2018 UCLA Henry Samueli Engineering Professional Achievement Award. This award honors the achievements of UCLA Engineering alumni in their chosen fields, including academia, industry, and entrepreneurship.

Computer Modeling Brain Phenomena to Solve Hard Problems

HRL Laboratories, LLC, computer scientists have found that computer models of a phenomenon in the brain called self-organized criticality (SOC) can be used to calculate optimal conditions within complex networks.